Category Archives: Heaven

A series of posts based on my Bible study, Heaven, by Randy Alcorn.

Heaven: Living in Light of Heaven…

This post is one in a series of posts on a Bible study I am doing titled Heaven by Randy Alcorn and Dave McCleskey. The focus of this study is to get a Biblical view of what heaven is really like.

Click HERE to see the previous post. Click HERE to start at the beginning.

Today’s post will be the last post for this study, because today’s lesson is the last lesson in the book. If I were to try an summarize what this entire study has taught me into one word, it would be perspective. The Christian life is really nothing more than a life lived with the proper perspective – the proper perspective of God and the proper perspective of Heaven. Allow me to quote a parable about Heaven written by Randy Alcorn in the book:

Imagine someone takes you to a party. You see a few friends there, enjoy a couple of good conversations, a little laughter, and some decent appetizers. The party’s all right, but you keep hoping it will get better. Give it another hour, and maybe it will. Suddenly your friend says “I need to take you home.”

Now?

You’re disappointed – nobody wants to leave a party early – but you leave, and your friend drops you off at your house. As you approach the door, you’re feeling all alone and sorry for yourself. As you open the door and reach for the light switch, you sense someone’s there. Your heart’s in your throat. You flip on the light.

“Surprise!” Your house is full of smiling people, familiar faces.

It’s a party – for you. You smell your favorites – barbecued ribs and pecan pie right out of the oven. The tables are full. It’s a feast. You recognize the guests, people you haven’t seen for a long time. Then, one by one, the people you most enjoyed at the other party show up at your house, grinning. This turns out to be the real party. You realize that if you’d stayed longer at the other party, as you’d wanted, you wouldn’t be at the real party – you’d be away from it.

This is a great illustration of the way many of us approach our lives here on earth. We think things are great – like a party we’d never want to leave. But we all know that at some point we are going to die. Everyone dies, no one is exempt. Every one of us has to leave this ‘party’ were currently at. But for those people who see Heaven as the real party, who know that it is truly better to be there, they don’t worry about staying at this one. They have the right perspective.

The Apostle Paul told the church in Philippi that “…forgetting what is behind and straining toward what is ahead, I press on toward the goal to win the prize for which God has called me heavenward in Christ Jesus.” (Philippians 3:13-14). That is the key to a life with the proper perspective – knowing that your goal is Heaven, and doing whatever it takes to reach that goal. That means not living in the past, remembering your glory days, but instead looking to the future, pressing on, doing things that are of importance to God’s kingdom. In the end, a life like that receives a great prize – Heaven.

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Heaven: Reaching Our Peak…

This post is one in a series of posts on a Bible study I am doing titled Heaven by Randy Alcorn and Dave McCleskey. The focus of this study is to get a Biblical view of what heaven is really like.

Click HERE to see the previous post. Click HERE to start at the beginning.

I’m currently keeping up with Wimbledon, a Grand Slam tennis tournament going on in London right now. One of the world’s greatest tennis players of all time, Roger Federer, lost yesterday in the quarter-finals to Tomas Berdych, the #12 player in the tournament. It was a huge upset that surprised almost everyone in the tennis world, and one of the things I read people saying now is that perhaps Roger Federer has passed his peak. He’s getting up there in age (he’s only 28 or 29, but tennis is a demanding sport), so whenever he started losing matches, people assumed it was because he just isn’t physically capable of playing at the level required to win. Every professional athlete goes through that phase in their career – the time when they are no longer capable of playing at the professional level (unless you’re Brett Favre). I wonder, sometimes, if these athletes ever look back on their lives and wish they could return to their glory days. I wonder if they look to their past and think “my best years are behind me, and I have nothing to look forward to…” I hope that they don’t, because that would be depressing!  But today’s study talked about this very topic – that unless you have Jesus as your savior, when you get older this will be your exact line of thinking. Your best days will be in your past. But for those of us in Christ, every day on this earth is just leading us closer to our peak – our renewed, resurrected bodies on the New Earth.

Today’s post will be short (because today’s lesson was short), but I do want to point out some things that are true if you look at life from the perspective that you have yet to reach your peak:

  • If the best part of your life is yet to come, then there is no need to be disappointed about unfulfilled dreams. If you weren’t able to do things on this earth that you wanted to do because of a lack of money, time, health or whatever else, those resources will be unlimited in Heaven. You will still get to do those things, and your dreams still have the potential to be fulfilled.
  • When people feel their resources are limited, they often make poor choices. If I feel my time is limited, I may choose to do something that is self-pleasing now, thinking that I may never again get the opportunity. But when we have an eternity in Heaven to experience things, we are more likely to pass up on those pleasures now, which is often the best choice.
  • Knowing that our bodies will be strong and healthy in Heaven helps us to see health problems as temporary. I have been blessed with relatively good health most of my life, but when I look at people who are bed-ridden or have serious health problems, I wonder if I were in their situation if I wouldn’t feel angry, resentful, and envious of those with better health. It’s likely that I will experience some kind of health issues in my life, and I hope that when that time comes I will be able to keep the right perspective – that this life is temporary, and these health issues will pass away when this life does.
  • An eternal perspective drives obedience. Randy Alcorn said in my study that “everything done in dependence on God will bear fruit for eternity.” There are things we do on earth that have eternal consequences, whether good or bad. Obedience to God’s commands means reward in Heaven, so keeping a Heavenly perspective fresh on our minds will help us to be obedient.

Click HERE to see the last post in this series.

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Heaven: Will There Be Arts, Entertainment, and Sports?

This post is one in a series of posts on a Bible study I am doing titled Heaven by Randy Alcorn and Dave McCleskey. The focus of this study is to get a Biblical view of what heaven is really like.

Click HERE to see the previous post. Click HERE to start at the beginning.

Although today is not my last lesson in this study of Heaven, today’s lesson did cause me to think about the overall effect this study has had on me and my Christian spirituality. When a person has a view of Heaven that he finds exciting, it motivates him to live a very different life. When you see that you are going to live for eternity, it makes this present life seem small and insignificant. Taking risks for the cause of Christ aren’t a big deal – if you die for that cause, it will only mean you are that much closer to living in Paradise. When you see that Heaven is not boring, it makes the thought of going there appealing. It gives you a goal, something to look forward to, a hope. And we are more likely to share that hope with others when we are excited about it. Jesus commanded us to share this hope, this salvation through faith in Him, and getting excited about Heaven motivates you to do this.

So what about today’s study caused me to think about these things? It’s quite simple, really. The thought of sports in Heaven. I love sports – watching them and playing them. I love to play tennis and basketball, and the thought of getting to do this in Heaven excites me. Some people may argue that there can’t be sports in Heaven because there can’t be losers – they say that competition would bring sadness, anger, or spite out of people, and those emotions won’t be present in the eternal Heaven, right? Alcorn doesn’t think so, and neither do I.  I think that when we get to Heaven, we’ll see all things from a new perspective, and playing sports will be enjoyable regardless of winning and losing. I enjoy playing tennis in my local men’s league, even though I have lost every match I’ve played so far. I think playing in Heaven will be just as enjoyable regardless of winners and losers.

Another point brought up by Alcorn is the fact that there will be music in Heaven. In Revelation 14:2-3, when speaking of the 144,000 Jews that had been redeemed, it says “And I heard a sound from heaven like the roar of rushing waters and like a loud peal of thunder. The sound I heard was like that of harpists playing their harps. And they sang a new song before the throne and before the four living creatures and the elders.”  And Revelation 15:2-3 tells of those in Heaven who “held harps given them by God and sang the song of Moses the servant of God and the song of the Lamb…” We know from the Apostle John’s testimony here that there will be singing and music played in Heaven, and I believe it will be another area we will take joy in when we get there.

One last area I’ll write about from today’s study was that of telling stories. The people throughout Biblical times (especially Old Testament times) relied on story-telling to relay historical tales, since most couldn’t read or write. When I think about how much fun that must have been, gathering around to hear the stories of their ancestors and their pasts, it makes me a little sad that we are so oriented toward writing today. It’s better that we can write, in the sense that facts are better preserved, but I do think that we have lost some of the social aspects they had back then that were related to story-telling. When we get to Heaven, I believe we will still be able to read and write, but I think there will also be a lot of story-telling. We’ll be able to hear first-hand accounts of stories we always loved from the Bible, as well as stories we never knew about, perhaps even in the backgrounds of our own lives. And there will be so much joy in our social interactions that we will smile and we will laugh. Jesus promised that there would be laughter in Heaven – Luke 6:21 says “Blessed are you who hunger now, for you will be satisfied. Blessed are you who weep now, for you will laugh.”

I am truly looking forward to a Heaven like this. I am excited about the idea of sitting around hearing and telling stories, of laughing and enjoying the company of others. I long for a Heaven where beautiful music is played all the time, and perhaps I’ll even get a chance to learn to play music I was never able to play on the present earth. And I crave the idea of playing sports, of getting out on the tennis court and hitting some powerful serves, some well executed forehands, and some backhand slices with perfect form. I might still lose a lot, but I’ll have eternity to get better.

Click HERE to see the next post in this series.

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Heaven: Engaging in Work and Expressing Creativity

This post is one in a series of posts on a Bible study I am doing titled Heaven by Randy Alcorn and Dave McCleskey. The focus of this study is to get a Biblical view of what heaven is really like.

Click HERE to see the previous post. Click HERE to start at the beginning.

In continuing our discussion this week of things we will do for eternity on the New Earth, today we’ll look at how work will be engaging for us and how we will express our creativity. Some people tend to believe that, since in many ways the New Earth resembles the Garden of Eden, perhaps our culture and technology will revert to the simplicity that existed at that time. In Genesis 4:19-22 it tells of descendants of Adam and his son Cain after they were expelled from Eden – “Lamech married two women, one named Adah and the other Zillah. Adah gave birth to Jabal; he was the father of those who live in tents and raise livestock. His brother’s name was Jubal; he was the father of all who play the harp and flute. Zillah also had a son, Tubal-Cain, who forged all kinds of tools out of bronze and iron.” (emphasis added). If these industrial, cultural, and technological advances were not around until after Adam and Eve’s expulsion from Eden, then they weren’t around in Eden. So if the New Earth is so much like Eden, some people may wonder, then perhaps we will lose these advances. Fortunately for us, this doesn’t seem to be the case. The description of the New Jerusalem (see a discussion of this here) would lead one to believe that industry, culture, and technology will likely carry over from what we currently see on earth.

Engaging in Work

For 6 years I worked in the public school system, 5 years as a teacher and 1 year prior to that as an instructional assistant. I loved hanging out with the kids, but there were certain aspects of the teaching job itself that I was not well-suited for. After a while, I knew that I would have to change careers at some point, so I went back to school to be a software developer, and that is what I do today. I’m brand new at it, but I can already tell that this kind of work is much more fitting for my personality than teaching was. In Heaven, I believe that whatever work we are given will be perfectly aligned with the things we are good at. I also believe that we will have plenty of motivation to do well at whatever work we are given. That means that our work will directly contribute to something that is important to God, or our work will directly affect our own circumstances. In Isaiah 65:21, when describing the New Heavens and the New Earth, it says “They will build houses and dwell in them; they will plant vineyards and eat their fruit.” I’m not much of a carpenter or a farmer, but with any kind of learned skill I would definitely be motivated to do either of these activities if they directly affected my own circumstances (whether I had a house or fruit to eat). I don’t believe God will allow me to go without shelter or food in Heaven, but that doesn’t mean He won’t make me do work for it. I also think we’ll do other (non-self-serving) work, as well. Alcorn says that “in Heaven, we’ll reign with Christ, exercise leadership and authority, and make important decisions. We’ll set goals, devise plans, and share ideas.” We’ll be fully engaged in whatever work God gives us to do.

Expression of Creativity

Even under the Curse, humanity has been able to produce some extremely creative works. I think about the pyramids in Egypt, the works of art hung in museums throughout the world, and some of the pieces of music, plays, and movies we have created that are beautiful, moving, and entertaining. If we are able to accomplish these things on this cursed earth, what more will we be able to accomplish on the New Earth, where our resources will be made new and will be lavished on us by our loving God, and our time will be unlimited.

God will take joy in our craftsmanship, just as took joy in the craftsmanship of Bezalel in Exodus 31. Alcorn points out that Bezalel was the first person in the entire Bible to be said to “filled with the spirit,” and it just happens that he was chosen by God to do nothing more than “to make artistic designs for work in gold, silver and bronze, to cut and set stones, to work in wood, and to engage in all kinds of craftsmanship” (v. 4-5). He wasn’t a prophet or a priest – he was an artist. His creativity and craftsmanship are what God took joy in, and it will be the same for us in Heaven.

I believe that much of the technology we have today is a gift directly from God. The advances in medicine, the size of our networks, and the complexity of our microprocessors are just small examples of the things we have accomplished in the last 100 years (or less!). These accomplishments have given us great power, and to quote Spiderman’s uncle, “with great power comes great responsibility.” We’re called to use these gifts in ways that glorify God. But the great thing about these gifts and this calling is that “God’s gifts and his call are irrevocable” (Romans 11:29). That means that God isn’t going to take it back when this earth passes away and a New Earth is put in it’s place. We will continue on in much the same way we are now, with many of the same industries we have now, using much of the same technology we have now, expressing perhaps even more creativity than we do now. And we’ll be engaged throughout it all.

Click HERE to see the next post in this series.

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Heaven: An Eternity of Discovery…

This post is one in a series of posts on a Bible study I am doing titled Heaven by Randy Alcorn and Dave McCleskey. The focus of this study is to get a Biblical view of what heaven is really like.

Click HERE to see the previous post. Click HERE to start at the beginning.

As I’ve read through this study on Heaven by Randy Alcorn, I have come to discover many new truths from God’s Word about our eternal destination. I’ve come to the understanding that we will likely have physical bodies, live on a physical earth, and do many physical activities like eat and maybe even sleep. But one area that Alcorn had spoken briefly about before but that I still wasn’t 100% sure about was the idea that we would spend endless amounts of time in Heaven learning – about God and His creation, about His attributes and His grace, and about the ways He participated in our lives when we didn’t even know He was there. I always held some kind of belief that when we get to Heaven, part of us being made flawless meant that we would no longer have a need to learn anything – maybe I thought we would know everything as God knows everything. Or perhaps I thought that we would be mindless beings with no motivation to learn anything or even have any thoughts about anything other than worshipful thoughts toward God. But today’s study helped me see that, just as we will have physical and spiritual sides, we will also have a intellectual side.

To say that we will know everything as God knows everything once we get to Heaven would be an extravagant overstatement. In 1 Corinthians 13:12, when Paul said “Now we see but a poor reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known,” he wasn’t speaking of being omniscient (all-knowing) as God is omniscient. Looking at the context of the verse, you can see that Paul is talking about spiritual gifts, one of them being the gift of knowledge. A pastor of mine once explained that the spiritual gift of knowledge was the ability of a person to accept supernatural direction from God, especially when it comes to understanding His Word. Many great pastors and scriptural teachers have this gift, and it is very closely related to the gift of prophecy. Paul says in this passage that some gifts, including this gift of knowledge, will pass away (v. 8). When we get to Heaven, we will no longer need supernatural direction because we will be in the presence of God Himself. Therefore, things will be clear to us (not as a “poor reflection” but as clearly as “face to face”). And we’ll know God fully, but we won’t know everything there is to know. Peter made it clear that even angels don’t know everything there is to know – when speaking of mysteries of salvation through Christ, he said “Even angels long to look into these things” (1 Peter 1:12). If angels who are already in Heaven with God long to look into some things, then it’s obvious they don’t know everything, and neither will we when we get there.

Ephesians 2:6-7 says “And God raised us up with Christ and seated us with him in the heavenly realms in Christ Jesus, in order that in the coming ages he might show the incomparable riches of his grace, expressed in his kindness to us in Christ Jesus.” Alcorn points out that this passage uses past tense to talk about seating us with Christ, but uses a continual future tense to talk about Christ showing us “the incomparable riches of his grace…” Christ will continually reveal to us the things of Heaven, breaking up these extremely complex mysteries into finite bits of understandable knowledge. This is learning. And it won’t be a negative experience like so many people have memories of here on the present earth. We’ll learn about things that actually interest us, things that we’ve always wanted to know.

Alcorn finished today’s study by pointing out that God could easily impart knowledge to us when we get to Heaven – he apparently did so with Adam and Even in their creation, since they had some vocabulary when they were first created. But every other person since that time has had to learn every bit of knowledge through some kind of studying. Something I thought about was the fact that our enhanced ability to learn is really what sets us apart from the rest of God’s creation. A dog can learn tricks, but he can’t learn calculus. A gorilla can learn sign language, but he can’t read a book. We have a gift of being able to learn, and for God to take that away from us when we get to Heaven would be to take away part of our human-ness. We have an insatiable desire for the truth (which I believe was given to us as a part of our creation) that no other species has. And since God is the author of the truth, when we go to live with Him for eternity, much of our time will be spent discovering that truth. “In Heaven our intellectual curiosity will sure surface – and be satisfied – only to surface and be satisfied again and again.”

Click HERE to see the next post in this series.

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Heaven: What Will We Experience Together?

This post is one in a series of posts on a Bible study I am doing titled Heaven by Randy Alcorn and Dave McCleskey. The focus of this study is to get a Biblical view of what heaven is really like.

Click HERE to see the previous post. Click HERE to start at the beginning.

There’s no way I can describe the relief that has slowly come upon me over the last few weeks. As I’ve stated before, most of my beliefs about Heaven caused me to fear going there, and before now I would say that my motivation for wanting to go to Heaven was more an aversion to going to hell than a desire to go to Heaven. But I’m learning lately that my God is a God who changes perspectives. He’s changing my perspective about Heaven, and I am very grateful for it.

Today’s study asked the question “what will we experience together?” I’m not sure that the lesson actually covered anything new, but it explained some thoughts on topics previously discussed that were refreshing and good to hear.  Alcorn talked about the fact that we will be continuing our relationships in Heaven that we had on earth, and and we’ll get to meet all the saints who we have admired but never met face to face. We will eat with these people, talk together, tell stories, and build relationships with them for eternity. Any and every detail you ever wanted to know about any Bible story can be told by someone who was there and witnessed it or experienced it. We’ll have our own stories to tell, and as Alcorn puts it, “the memories and skills to tell them well.”

The idea of continuing relationships with people who we knew on this present earth automatically makes me think about how we will feel about the ones we knew who didn’t go to Heaven, but instead went to hell. As I stated in yesterday’s post, I’ve been asked if it was even possible to remember our loved ones in Heaven if there’s a conflict between remembering them if they’re in hell, and yet never experiencing sadness. Some people even say that we won’t know hell exists, because it would spoil our joy. Unfortunately, this idea that God will make us ignorant of hell is not scriptural. If anything, the Bible says that we will praise God for His justice. In Revelation 18:20, after describing the judgment on the “great city,” it says “Rejoice over her, O heaven! Rejoice, saints and apostles and prophets! God has judged her for the way she treated you.” At that time all in Heaven will rejoice at God’s judgment, and it will likely be the same when we are Heaven and those who we loved on earth yet rejected Christ are in hell. Though, with our current perspective, we could never see ourselves being joyful in Heaven with the knowledge that someone we probably remember from earth is in hell, remember that when we’re in the present of God, our perspectives will change dramatically.  Alcorn puts it this way:

We’ll embrace God’s holiness and justice. We’ll praise Him for his goodness and grace. God will be our source of joy. Hell’s small and distant shadow will not interfere with God’s greatness or our joy in Him.

If anything, the thought of our loved ones NOT being in Heaven with us should be enough motivation for us to share the gospel with them.

One last area that Alcorn talked about in today’s lesson that really touched me was how we will get the opportunity to make up for lost time in our relationships. The parent whose child died when they were young will get to re-unite with him and spend eternity getting to know him. The child who never knew her grandmother because she died before she was born will spend eternity getting to know her. I have been very blessed in that I don’t particularly feel that I have had many of my relationships cut short, but I do like the idea of others getting to regain those opportunities. And I know that my own family won’t be around forever. It’ll be good to see them again, and to experience the best God has for us for eternity with them.

Click HERE to see the next post in this series.

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Heaven: What Will Our Relationships Be Like?

This post is one in a series of posts on a Bible study I am doing titled Heaven by Randy Alcorn and Dave McCleskey. The focus of this study is to get a Biblical view of what heaven is really like.

Click HERE to see the previous post. Click HERE to start at the beginning.

Someone once asked me if I thought we would know the people we know now on earth in Heaven. At the time, I couldn’t answer that question because I had no scriptural basis to believe one way or the other. The person who asked said they didn’t see how we could, because if we did and we saw that they weren’t admitted to Heaven, we would be sad. And there’s that verse in Revelation that says there will be no more tears, right? So to recognize our loved ones and to have relationships with them would not be reasonable, right?  I disagree, and today’s study discussed this topic and only served to strengthen my belief.

John Calvin, a theologist from the mid-1500s, once said “to be in Paradise and live with God is not to speak to each other and be heard by each other, but is only to enjoy God, to feel his good will, and rest in Him.” To understand why Calvin would say something like this, you have to understand Calvin’s beliefs – he was extremely against anything that took man’s focus off of God. He was even against the creation of statues or images of God (of which the Catholic church had many), believing that they led to idolatry (see here). The fervency behind this belief probably led Calvin to the idea that focus on God’s image-bearers – us, as the followers of Christ – was also a form of idolatry and likely wouldn’t be allowed in Heaven, in the very presence of God. But unlike Calvin, I don’t believe that God is displeased by our relationships with other followers of Christ, but instead, I believe He takes joy in these relationships. He knew that Adam needed a companion in the Garden of Eden, and it pleased God to create Eve. I believe it will be the same in Heaven. Just as when I go to my local church to join in fellowship with other believers my focus shifts to God, my relationships in Heaven will help me shift my focus to God. As Alcorn puts it, “in heaven, no person will distract us from God.”

I believe that part of what we should take comfort in when thinking of Heaven is a reunion with those we love. Paul told the church in Thessalonica “God will bring with Jesus those who have fallen asleep in him…After that, we who are still alive and are left will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And so we will be with the Lord forever. Therefore encourage each other with these words.” (1 Thessalonians 4:14,17, emphasis added). Paul was speaking to them about those in Christ who had already died – he was telling them that they shouldn’t grieve over them like other men who have no hope, but that these would rise again, and that we would meet them again. This was a part of the hope they had in Christ.

“But,” you may say, “just because we are meeting each other again doesn’t mean we’ll recognize each other, right?”  True. But the idea that we won’t recognize each other stems from a belief that we will be spiritual beings who have lost our identities and memories. As I wrote about in a previous post, we will maintain our identities in Heaven. Jesus maintained His identity after His death and resurrection – why wouldn’t we do the same? And people were also able to recognize Jesus after His resurrection – Peter, John and others recognized Him when He cooked breakfast for them on the shore of the sea of Galilee (see John 21:1-14), the disciples recognized Him when he appeared to Thomas (see John 20:24-29), and Paul tells of a time when Jesus appeared to a group of more than 500 (see 1 Corinthians 15:6). If all these people could recognize a resurrected Christ, why won’t people be able to recognize us when our bodies have been resurrected and we are living on the New Earth?  Of course, some skeptics will use the example of the two men walking on the road to Emmaus not being able to recognize Jesus, but if you look closely at that passage, it says “they were kept from recognizing Him.” (Luke 24:16). Jesus wasn’t ready to be recognized in that situation – but later, when the time was right, the mens’ eyes were opened and they recognized Him (v. 31). I think the same will be true in Heaven – we’ll recognize each other just as we’ll recognize Christ. Perhaps we’ll even recognize people we don’t even know!  At the transfiguration of Jesus, Peter, James, and John seemed to recognize Moses and Elijah when they appeared, even though they had never seen them face-to-face (see Mark 9). Maybe in Heaven we’ll be able to instantly recognize people we know but have never met.

One final topic to discuss in this area is that of marriage and families. Jesus directly taught that “at the resurrection people will neither marry nor be given in marriage…” (Matthew 22:30). This is discouraging to some (like me) who happen to love being married and believe it will be a disappointment to not be married in Heaven. But some of the points Alcorn made helped me to be a little more open to this idea. He said that our marriages here on earth are only a small foretaste of what our true marriage will be like in Heaven – the marriage of Christ and His bride. In Heaven, our marriages “will be assimilated into the one great marriage [our earthly marriages] foreshadowed.” And on top of this, we will probably still have a relationship with our wives/husbands and our families. Just as on earth the closer we are to Christ, the closer we draw to each other, in Heaven we will be the closest we have ever been to Christ, and we will be closer to our families than ever before. Will the relationship be different? Probably. How could they not be different? We’ll be in the presence of our God! Things that seemed important before will seem trivial at that point. But that doesn’t change the fact that we’ll still have relationships, and that those relationship will be an important part of our experience in Heaven.

You may be wondering why I didn’t answer the original question posed at the beginning of this post – if our loved ones aren’t in Heaven, won’t we be sad? And isn’t that in conflict with the idea of there being no sadness in Heaven?  The reason I haven’t answered this is because it’s talked about in tomorrow’s lesson, and I didn’t want to ruin it…  Tune in tomorrow. Same bat time. Same bat channel.

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